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May 16-17, 2018 | Washington, DC USA

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2017 Conference Agenda

 

MAY 24, 2017

 
7:30 am Registration/Continental Breakfast
 
8:00 am Chairperson's Opening Remarks
Robert Stevens, MD, Associate Professor, Anesthesiology & Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
 
8:05 am Development and Characterization of Preclinical Models of Repetitive mild TBI as a Platform for Therapeutic Target Identification and Biomarker Discovery
Thorough investigation of potential therapeutics in relevant animal models will be key to the identification of effective therapeutics for mTBI. The presentation will describe the work of the Roskamp team to develop and evaluate the consequences of single mTBI and various repetitive mTBI paradigms, including chronic time points. Our characterization of the consequences of single or repetitive mTBI to 24 months after final injury in the mouse, demonstrates the dramatic role of neuroinflammation which, once sustained, persists throughout the entire lifespan. Our different models exhibit unique and overlapping neurobehavioral, biochemical and neuropathological features, including TBI dependent tau pathology which persists long after the cessation of injury, and we are applying omic technologies to brain and plasma analyses at a range of time points post-injury to identify targets and biomarkers. Our platforms have led to the identification of several translatable therapeutic approaches and we are also exploring variables such as the effect of APOE genotype and dietary influences on TBI outcome. 
Fiona Crawford, Ph.D., President and CEO, Roskamp Institute
 
8:30 am Using a Clinically Relevant Large Animal Model Platform for TBI Therapy Development 
Dr. Margulies and her team have developed the first immature large animal translational treatment trial of a pharmacologic intervention for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. Recent pre-clinical data demonstrate promise of novel treatments after TBI. In this presentation, Dr. Margulies will describe this research and provide pre-clinical data.
Susan Margulies, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania
 
8:55 am Applying Machine Learning & Medical Robotics to Improve TBI characterization in Mild and Severe Populations
The challenges of characterizing and tracking subtle changes in hemodynamic function during Traumatic Brain Injury may be addressed by applying advanced forms of machine learning and medical robotics to supplement traditional neurologic assessment. In this presentation we examine new technologies and evaluate their potential to improve characterization of this disease vs. traditional qualitative and quantitative assessments.
Robert Hamilton, Ph.D., Co-Founder, Chief Scientific Officer, Neural Analytics
 
9:20 am NOXious Neuroinflammation: A New Therapeutic Target for Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury
In the presentation, Dr. Loane will:
► Describe how microglial NADPH oxidase (NOX2) contributes to chronic neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration after TBI
► Discuss redox mechanisms that regulate microglial form and function in the TBI brain.
► Explore the therapeutic potential of inhibiting NOX2-mediated neuroinflammation during the chronic phase of TBI
David J. Loane, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology, Shock, Trauma and Anesthesiology Research (STAR) Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine
 
9:45 am Refreshment Break/Scientific Poster Session Viewing
 
10:15 am Developing a Cognition Endpoint for TBI Clinical Trials
Cognitive impairment is a core clinical feature of traumatic brain injury (TBI), across the entire spectrum of injury severity. Following TBI, cognition is a key determinant of productivity outcomes and quality of life. As a final common pathway of diverse molecular and microstructural TBI mechanisms, cognition is an ideal efficacy outcome for many candidate drugs and non-pharmacological interventions. Cognition can be reliably and objectively measured with neuropsychological tests that have superior granularity over crude disability rating scales, which remain the standard for clinical trials. Remarkably, there is no well-defined, widely accepted, and validated cognition endpoint for TBI clinical trials. The long-term goal of our research program is to fill this need. This goal aligns closely with the TBI Endpoint Development (TED) initiative. A cognition endpoint that has excellent measurement precision across a wide functional range and is sensitive to the detection of small improvements (and declines) in cognitive functioning would enhance the power and precision of TBI clinical trials, accelerating drug development research.
Grant L. Iverson, Ph.D., Professor, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Harvard Medical School, Director, Neuropsychology Outcome Assessment Laboratory, Center for Health & Rehabilitation Research, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network, Director, MassGeneral Hospital for Children Sports Concussion Program
 
10:40 am Exosomes: Nano-restorative Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Diseases and Injury
Exosomes  are small (30-100 nm) endosomal particles consisting of a complex bilayer lipid membrane and contain proteins, RNAs,mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs). Nearly all cells generate exosomes, and these small lipid containers are ubiquitous in biological systems and provide an intercellular communications network which regulate cellular function.  In this presentation, I will describe our work on the treatment of experimental traumatic brain injury, stroke and  peripheral neuropathy using exosomes harvested from a variety of cells, as well as harvested exosomes tailored to contain specific miRNAs that are engineered to enhance neurological recovery concomitantly  with neurovascular plasticity. 
Michael Chopp, Ph.D., Vice Chairman, Department of Neurology and Scientific Director of Neuroscience Institute, Zoltan J. Kovacs Chair in Neuroscience Research, Henry Ford Health System, Distinguished Professor, Physics, Oakland University
 
11:05 am VAS203 for Moderate and Severe TBI: From Clinical Phase II to Phase III
This presentation will address the role of the inducible NO synthase in the pathophysiology of brain damage. The key results from the phase II clinical trial with VAS203 will be presented. In addition, recent information on the mechanism of action of VAS203 on the human kidney will be provided. The presentation will also cover the rationale for the design of the phase III trial, the relevant outcome parameters and explain some of the inclusion and exclusion criteria 
Frank Tegtmeier, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Vasopharm
 
11:30 am Phenoxybenzamine as a Neuroprotective Candidate for TBI
In this presentation, Dr. Poulsen will cover the following:
► Factors influencing the interpretation of preclinical data in the rat lateral fluid percussion injury model
► Data showing significant cognitive and behavioral improvements following treatment with phenoxybenzamine after severe TBI
► Data regarding potential plasma biomarker candidates for TBI severity and physiological response to phenoxybenzamine
David Poulsen, Ph.D., Professor, Translational Neuroscience, Department of Neurosurgery, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Buffalo
 
11:55 am Clinical Development of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) for Chronic Neurological Injury – the SanBio Experience
In this presentation, Dr. Bates will:
► Describe how one type of MSC is manufactured and administered
► Discuss preclinical & clinical data supporting IND and CTN approval for a stem cell based product
► Discuss learnings from clinical trial design and execution in the stem cell space
Damien Bates, MD, Ph.D., FRACS, MBA, Chief Medical Officer & Head of Research, SanBio
 
12:20 pm Luncheon
 
1:15 PANEL SESSION: Milestones and Existing Challenges in Preclinical and Clinical Development of TBI Therapeutics
Panelists:
Michael Chopp, Ph.D., Vice Chairman, Department of Neurology and Scientific Director of Neuroscience Institute, Zoltan J. Kovacs Chair in Neuroscience Research, Henry Ford Health System, Distinguished Professor, Physics, Oakland University
David Poulsen, Ph.D., Professor, Translational Neuroscience, Department of Neurosurgery, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Buffalo
Damien Bates, MD, Ph.D., FRACS, MBA, Chief Medical Officer & Head of Research, SanBio
Frank Tegtmeier, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Vasopharm
 
1:45 pm The Late Effects of TBI Study (LETBI): Overview and Preliminary Findings
In this presentation, Dr. O’Connor will present an overview of the LETBI study's methods. This is a multi-center study with extensive in-vivo characterization of individuals with chronic moderate-severe TBI: neurobehavioral evaluation, neuroimaging, serum biomarkers, motor examination, neurological exam, consent to brain donation: ex-vivo neuroimaging and histopathology). She will also highlight preliminary findings, which include co-registered antemortem and postmortem neuroimaging with histopathological correlation and extensive in-vivo phenotypic characterization on several cases.
Kristen Dams-O'Connor, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Director, Brain Injury Research Center, Research Director, Mount Sinai Injury Control Research Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
 
2:10 pm The Long-Term Effects of Penetrating and Closed Traumatic Brain Injuries
Dr. Grafman will present long-term outcome data on Vietnam Veterans who suffered a penetrating or closed combat-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). He will discuss factors such as cognitive reserve, genetic predisposition, and location and extent of brain damage on outcome variables such as employment, epilepsy, and cognitive/social functioning. Finally, he will discuss findings on exacerbated neurobehavioral decline and the risk of Neurodegenerative disorders influenced by a single prior TBI as measured by amyloid burden.
Jordan Grafman, Ph.D., Professor, Dept. of Physical Med. & Rehab., Neurology, Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer’s Ctr., Dept. of Psychiatry, Feinberg School of Med., Northwestern University
 
2:35 pm Comprehensive Longitudinal Analysis of the Causal Pathways for Post Concussion Symptom Reporting in OEF/OIF/OND Veterans
Persistent post-concussive symptoms (PCS) are traditionally viewed as indexing the long-term sequelae of concussion. However, there is a great deal of evidence in the civilian literature suggesting that PCS is also associated with pre-morbid and co-occurring current psychological conditions such as depression and anxiety. In the current study, we used the comprehensive lifetime brain injury and lifetime psychological trauma information gathered as part of the Translational Research Center for TBI and Stress Disorders (TRACTS) Longitudinal Cohort Study. Cross sectional analysis included 351 Veterans of OEF/OIF/OND and longitudinal analysis included a subset of 160 who had returned for their first follow-up evaluation. The prospective longitudinal data reveals a new perspective on the complex causal pathways between military concussion and PCS.
Regina McGlinchey, Ph.D., Director, TRACTS National Research Center, Associate Director for Research Training, GRECC, VA Boston Healthcare System, Associate Professor, Psychology, Harvard Medical School
William Milberg, Ph.D., Co-Director, Translational Research Center for TBI & Stress Disorders, VA Boston Healthcare System, Professor, Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
 
3:00 pm Refreshment Break/Scientific Poster Session Viewing
 
3:25 pm PANEL SESSION: The Long-Term Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury
Panelists:
Kristen Dams-O'Connor, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Director, Brain Injury Research Center, Research Director, Mount Sinai Injury Control Research Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
Jordan Grafman, Ph.D., Professor, Dept. of Physical Med. & Rehab., Neurology, Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer’s Ctr., Dept. of Psychiatry, Feinberg School of Med., Northwestern University
Regina McGlinchey, Ph.D., Director, TRACTS National Research Center, Associate Director for Research Training, GRECC, VA Boston Healthcare System, Associate Professor, Psychology, Harvard Medical School
William Milberg, Ph.D., Co-Director, Translational Research Center for TBI & Stress Disorders, VA Boston Healthcare System, Professor, Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
 
3:55 pm The Canadian Traumatic Brain Injury Research Consortium (CTRC): A Collaborative Research Model
In January 2016, a large group of Canadian scientists led by Drs. Jamie Hutchison et Alexis Turgeon were awarded a grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research to create the Canadian Traumatic brain injury Research Consortium (CTRC). This Consortium will help strengthen collaboration between TBI scientists working in this field, to develop clinical research with an international scope and will favor the knowledge transfer of research findings. In this presentation, Dr. Hutchison and Dr. Turgeon, will provide an overview of the CTRC, including the consortium’s mission, vision and objectives. They will also discuss how collaborative research is conducted within the CTRC and will provide examples of some of the research currently being conducted.
Jamie Hutchison, MD, FRCPC, Research Director, Critical Care Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Kids, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Co-Chair, Canadian Traumatic Brain Research Consortium (CTRC)
Alexis Turgeon, MD MSc (Epid) FRCPC, Associate Professor and Research Director, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Co-Chair, Canadian Traumatic Brain Research Consortium (CTRC)
 
4:25 pm Rehabilitation after Concussion: a Pediatric Experience
Childhood and adolescence is characterized by ongoing development. Both assessment and treatment after concussion needs to be adapted to children’s specific developmental stages. The purpose of this presentation is to review the existing evidence supporting treatment approaches in pediatric and adolescent concussion rehabilitation both in the acute and subacute phases post-injury. She will discuss the impact of exercise-based intervention in children and adolescents on concussion recovery and overall well-being. She will also describe the introduction of dynamic visual attention interventions in concussion rehabilitation and their potential uses in both diagnosis and treatment.
Isabelle Gagnon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy/Pediatrics, McGill University, Clinical Scientist, Trauma/Child Development, Montreal Children’s Hospital
 
4:50 pm Neurobiopsychosocial Model of TBI: Lessons Learned from Sports Concussion Research
Applied research over the past 20 years has produced major advances in the basic and clinical science of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and concussion. In particular, findings from the study of sport-related concussion (SRC) have been readily translatable to our understanding of mTBI in civilians, military service members and other populations affected by mTBI. Technological advances in functional neuroimaging and biological markers have created a powerful bridge between the clinical and basic science of mTBI in humans. This session will review findings from clinical, basic science and functional neuroimaging studies that now establish a foundation on which to build an integrative, comprehensive model of mTBI recovery.
Mike McCrea, Ph.D., ABPP, Professor with Tenure, Director of Brain Injury Research, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin
 
5:15 pm Evening Cocktail Reception
 

MAY 25, 2017

 
7:30 am Continental Breakfast
 
7:55 am Chairperson's Opening Remarks
Andreas Jeromin, Ph.D., Chief Medical Officer (consulting), Quanterix Corp.
 
8:00 am New Frontiers in CNS Biomarkers
The presentation will describe the use of the single-molecule  array technology (Simoa) developed by Quanterix Corp. for the ultra-sensitive detection of CNS biomarkers. Simoa has been successfully applied to a number of CNS biomarker applications, including for the first time the detection of tau in blood in concussion. As shown, in a recent study tau in blood could inform return-to-play in concussed athletes.
Andreas Jeromin, Ph.D., Chief Medical Officer (consulting), Quanterix Corp.
 
8:25 am A Tale of Two Biomarkers – Changing the Paradigm for Concussion Management in the Emergency Department in Children and Adults
A blood test for traumatic brain injury (TBI) is on the horizon, and private enterprises are commercializing TBI biomarkers for US Food and Drug Administration approval. Brain injury biomarker research has skyrocketed in the last decade and two promising blood-based biomarkers have emerged as potentially useful in the emergency department in suspected mild TBI and concussion in both adults and children. Current evidence indicates that both these markers are detectable in serum in less than an hour after concussion and are able to distinguish between patients with concussion and other trauma. They have also been shown to predict traumatic intracranial lesions on CT and neurosurgical intervention over a week post-injury.
Linda Papa, MD, CM, MSc, CCFP, FRCPC, FACEP, Director of Academic Clinical Research, Attending Emergency Physician, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Professor, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Associate Professor, Florida State University College of Medicine, Adjunct Professor, University of Florida College of Medicine, Adjunct Professor, McGill University
 
8:50 am Circulating Brain Damage Markers for the Diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury: the Questions You Never Dared to Ask
At present, the role of body fluid biomarkers in TBI is primarily relegated to research studies, and the provision of high levels of evidence is paramount to overcome regulatory hurdle and support their adoption and routine use in clinical practice. A comprehensive summary and critical of the existing body of evidence for the use of blood protein biomarkers for diagnosis of brain injury in patients presenting to the ED after mild head trauma will be provided. A number of unaddressed issues on the relevant variables that can potentially influence biomarker concentrations and their diagnostic accuracy will be discussed and direct comparisons of diagnostic performance of different marker tests will be presented.
Stefania Mondello, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Professor, University of Messina
 
9:15 am Blood-Based Biomarkers in the Emergency Room: Utility, Diagnostic Specificity and Costs
In this presentation, Dr. Peacock will discuss current TBI assessment practices in hospital emergency departments, clinical utility of objective TBI blood tests and his impressions of TBI biomarkers in development. He will then present data related to a 3 panel marker that has demonstrated an ability to improve specificity. Finally, Dr. Peacock will also discuss the risk, benefits and cost issues relating to emergency department testing.
W. Frank Peacock, IV, MD, FACEP, Associate Chief of Emergency Medicine Research, Baylor College of Medicine
 
9:40 am Refreshment Break/Scientific Poster Session Viewing
 
10:00 am PANEL SESSION: Trends in Biomarker Development for Traumatic Brain Injury
 Panelists:
W. Frank Peacock, IV, MD, FACEP, Associate Chief of Emergency Medicine Research, Baylor College of Medicine
Linda Papa, MD, CM, MSc, CCFP, FRCPC, FACEP, Director of Academic Clinical Research, Attending Emergency Physician, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Professor, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Associate Professor, Florida State University College of Medicine, Adjunct Professor, University of Florida College of Medicine, Adjunct Professor, McGill University
Stefania Mondello, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Professor, University of Messina
 
10:30 am Longitudinal Electrophysiological Signatures of Mild Blast Brain Injury in a Novel Mouse Model
Mild traumatic brain injury can produce short-term cognitive deficits, which may be accompanied by chronic cognitive and behavioral changes in the weeks or months following injury. In this study, longitudinal electrophysiological signatures of brain injury were measured with high-density intracranial recording electrodes in the mouse. Changes resulting from a novel, blast-related injury were quantified at short-term (first 24 hours) and long-term (up to 6 months) time points, and behavioral and histological alterations were also assessed. Acute deficits in somatosensory evoked potentials and long-term changes in resting brain oscillations were accompanied by behavioral abnormalities and evidence of mild neuroinflammation. 
Meijun Ye, Ph.D., Staff Scientist, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Device and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
 
10:55 am Rapid Detection of TBI Biomarkers Using Tbit™ Nanowire Technology to Reduce Unnecessary Head CT
Standard practice of mTBI diagnosis includes head CT, which is often inconclusive and results in unnecessary radiation exposure and cost. Silicon nanowires are being developed for the detection of biomarkers of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) as a screening test to reduce head CT. The measurement is based on a well-established antigen-antibody interaction. The binding of antigen to antibodies located on the surface of the nanowire results in the change of electric field in a narrow layer surrounding the nanowire, which affects conductivity of the nanowire and can be reliably measured using electronic means. This integration of biological reaction and electronics into the Tbit™ immuno-resistive™ sensor allows for the sensitive measurement in complex biological matrices, such as blood or plasma, without extensive sample preparation. Application of this technology to mTBI diagnosis promises fast delivery of actionable information about a patient’s state. We present an update on the progress of our development and result of initial evaluation of the system with 100 patient samples.
Sergey Dryga, Ph.D., MBA, Chief Scientific Officer, Biodirection
 
11:20 am Traumatic Brain Injury Research: Historical and Current Perspectives 
In this presentation, Dr. Curley will review the topic of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from the distant past (6000+ years ago) to today. The theme of the presentation will be that much of what we have seen in the past 15 years is neither new nor necessarily unique. The issue of TBI in combat casualties became of increasing concern in the 18th and 19th centuries, as more powerful explosive weapons were developed and used. By World War I, many of the clinical findings and research conclusions were sufficiently detailed to be understandable and even current with our emerging knowledge base. The goal of this presentation is to urge researchers and clinicians to continue their investigations so that unlike past conflicts, this problem doesn’t yet again find itself pushed into dusty corners of medical libraries only to be rediscovered without any significant advancement of knowledge in the next major conflict. 
Kenneth C. Curley, MD, Principal Subject Matter Expert, General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT) Supporting theNeurotrauma and Psychological Health Program Management Office (NPH-PMO), US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity (USAMMDA)
 
11:45 am Navigating the Regulatory Landscape for Neurological Devices and Moving Products to Patients
The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ensures that patients in the U.S. have access to safe and effective medical devices. The Division of Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices reviews medical devices that interface with the nervous system. This presentation will assist attendees on how to navigate the FDA’s regulatory landscape to bring medical devices to patients.
Carlos Peña Ph.D., Director, Division of Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices, Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), U.S. Food and Drug Administration
 
12:10 pm Luncheon
 
1:00 pm Neuroimaging as a Biomarker for Traumatic Brain Injury
Concussion, also defined as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in the Department of Defense (DoD), represents a heterogeneous disease syndrome. The "gold standard" diagnostic tool is clinical acumen; however, this method remains subjective and based upon a clinician’s level of knowledge and training. A large portion of current research in TBI encompasses efforts to derive a biological, objective test or series of tests to best diagnose injury, predict outcome, and guide treatment/rehabilitation efforts. The field is turning to the latest advances in neuroimaging technologies to search for sensitive, validated biomarkers of TBI. Neuroimaging researchers are using an array of advanced techniques to find qualitative and quantitative measures to objectively describe in vivo macro and microscopic physiology associated with TBI pathophysiology, and potentially, long-term outcome. This presentation will discuss one possible medical paradigm to put into perspective the efforts in TBI biomarker research and showcase recent efforts to apply advances in neuroimaging to the challenges associated with the heterogeneity of the TBI population.
Sidney R. Hinds II, MD, COL, MC, USA, DoD Brain Health Research Program Coordinator, Blast Injury Research Program Coordinating Office, Medical Advisor to the Principal Assistant for Research & Technology, US Army Medical Research & Materiel Command
 
1:25 pm Rewiring of the Hippocampus After Exposure to Concussive Blast Injury 
To study the effects of blast overpressure directly, Dr. Meaney’s team examined the cognitive and synaptic plasticity changes that occurred over the first week following blast loading in mice. They show direct evidence that blast exposure, in the absence of significant head acceleration and impact, will cause cognitive deficits and hippocampal circuit changes. Using a head mounted microscope imaging system in awake, behaving animals, his team also shows that blast overpressure causes an immediate reduction in electrical activity – indicated with high speed calcium imaging - within the hippocampus. Over time, this hippocampus activity pattern in brain-injured mice returns to preinjury conditions. However, the hippocampus shows significant changes in the information coding capacity among neurons in the network at least 2 weeks after a single blast exposure, even though cognitive impairments are no longer evident. Together, these data show that the rewiring of the hippocampus in vivo undergoes continual remodeling beyond the window of behavioral improvement, and indicates the need to pinpoint the mechanisms of information re-coding more precisely in the blast injured brain.
David F. Meaney, Ph.D., Solomon R. Pollack Professor and Chair Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science
 
1:50 pm Understanding the Complexities of Traumatic Brain Injury: Big Data Approach to Tackle a “Big Disease”
Big Data (BD) is a term for extremely large data sets that are so huge and complex that they cannot be analyzed using traditional approaches. BD and Big Data Analytics (BDA) have been successfully employed in fields as diverse as logistics, counter terrorism and health care. One of the beneficiaries of using BD and BDA will be traumatic brain injury (TBI). BDA is ideally suited for TBI where most of the data is unstructured, incomplete and messy. Successful use of BDA in TBI requires collecting and storing ALL data elements, physical, biological, structural and clinical that may not be curated and can remain incomplete. Employing BDA in TBI can reveal correlations between physical forces collected by sensors, biological responses such as imaging, functional impairments, molecular pathologies and their temporal patterns, among others. Importantly, using BDA will help to close the substantial gap between preclinical and clinical studies. In this lecture, Dr. Agoston will highlight the needs, the benefits and challenges of employing BDA to tackle the “big disease” TBI. 
Denes V. Agoston, MD, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
 
2:15 pm PANEL SESSION: Translational Gaps in Traumatic Brain Injury Diagnosis and Treatment
Chair: 
Magali Haas, MD, Ph.D., CEO and President, Cohen Veterans Bioscience
Panelists:
Pat Kochanek, MD, FCCM, Professor and Vice Chairman, Dept. of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Patrick Bellgowan, Ph.D., Program Director, Repair and Plasticity, Division of Extramural Research, NINDS, NIH
Dallas Hack, MD, Chief Strategy Officer, Cohen Veterans Bioscience
Sidney R. Hinds II, MD, COL, MC, USA, DoD Brain Health Research Program Coordinator, Blast Injury Research Program Coordinating Office, Medical Advisor to the Principal Assistant for Research & Technology, US Army Medical Research & Materiel Command
Michael Singer, Ph.D., CEO, BrainScope
 
3:15 pm End of Conference

 

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